Wine vs. Beer – the Definitive Infographic!

This week I was sent a link to a most useful infographic comparing America’s trends for wine consumption and beer consumption.  It makes for interesting reading…

Beer & Wine: Comparison Of Popular Brands, Surprising Facts And Market Trends
 

Brought to you by: http://comparecamp.com Author: David Adelman Subscribe to our: FriendFeed

Advice for Enjoying Edmunds St. John’s 2012 “Rocks & Gravel”

Edmunds St. Johns 2012 R&G Label

I opened this wine for last week’s customer tasting, and want to pass along what we found.  Just a couple of quick ideas can help you greatly increase the enjoyment of this profound wine.

The wine is aromatic and lively, even a bit frizzante at first.  The best glass of this wine I had all evening was actually the next morning, after the wine had been exposed to 12 hours worth of air.

To enjoy this wine to the fullest, break out your decanter (or any clean, wide-bottomed glass container), pop the cork and give this wine a good sloshing as you pour - this baby needs air – and some active swirling once decanted. If you can plan in advance, you’d be wise to decant two or three hours before pouring the first glass.

The Wine – A blend of Grenache, Syrah and Mourvedre (“GSM” 55/27/18%)  from Sonoma’s famed Unti Vineyard.  Give your glass a good swirl-n-sniff and you’ll get generous aromas of candied red fruits, sweet spices and dark fruits – blackberry and bitter cherries and delicious hints of sweet black licorice and cola. If you can find the willpower, this wine will reward a few years of quiet repose.  It is a baby right now.

For more info or to purchase, click here.

Cheers!

The “New” Ice Bucket Challenge?

I’ve watched with great interest the viral success of the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge.  Congrats to ALS for this most deserved windfall.

And now, I wonder “what’s next”?  Every non-profit in the country is studying this case to find ways to replicate it.  Well, I think can speak for all the Managers at all the Tasting Rooms for every winery when I say “I hope  the next big trend is NOT the Spit Bucket Challenge”.  So messy.

Is the "Spit Bucket Challenge" Next?

P.S.  October of 2014 marks the 10-yr anniversary of this movie.  You’d be amazed how many of my Millenial customers have no idea what it was.  It’s worth the $4-$5 you’ll spend on the DVD!

Guittard Chocolate & Wine – Specific Pairings Make the Difference!

The pairing of wine and chocolate is a media darling.  Like clock work, you can expect the tired topic to be rolled out before every Valentine’s day.  But few wines actually pair well with chocolate, truth be told.  And those that do, well, they tend to be wines that work best as cocktails.  Or shooters.  Ripe, fruit-driven, and big, big, big.

Which is why it was so refreshing to see this new take on pairing wine and chocolates, undertaken by the gourmet chocolate company, Guittard.  With San Francisco roots that go back to the gold rush, founder Etienne Guittard continued his family’s chocolate tradition right here in the Bay area.  And given our proximity to CA wine country, perhaps the only question is why it took Guittard so long to hit upon this brilliant idea!

I send hearty congratulations to our friends at Four Graces and Roederer, two of the four wines picked by the tasting panel Guittard put together, and wines that you’ll frequently find on my own list of favorites.

Read the full story here.

Cheers!  Dave “the Wine Merchant”

The ‘Mini-Mouth’ Robotic Wine Taster. Real News or Satire??

I think the folks over at The Onion got hold of today’s wine business news feed.   Those sneaky little devils.  The article that raised both my eyebrows was today’s report that nano-scientists have introduced a robotic wine taster of sorts.  We all know someone who works in nano-technology, right?  You probably go out of your way to invite them to every cocktail party for their amazing ability to make small talk (sorry).  I’m not convinced the young woman shown in the PR release is even a scientist – she’s far too cheerful.nanoscientist

Yeah, a group not known for their sense of humor, I’m guessing.  But these very same Nano-scientists announced their wine-tasting machine in today’s news -  here’s a link to the full article, which I’ll summarize below.

Now admittedly, wine critics don’t need to fear for their jobs just yet.  The new nano-sensor can only measure the level of tannin (astringency) in a wine.  But it can do so at any stage of the winemaking process, unlike their carbon-based counterparts (um, that’s you and me) who can sense this important element of red wines at the end of the process, when it’s too late to make natural adjustments (other than additives, shhhh).

For those who fear the machine’s eventual replacement of all things human, fret not.  Buried towards the end of the article is the good news that human saliva is still needed for the machine to accurately measure astringency.  Mini-mouth, you complete me.

New Union Wine Co. Ad Campaign Pokes Fun At Wine Snobs

Every once in a while, if you’re lucky, you get to see an ad campaign that changes your industry. You may have to set your way-back machine all the way back to the Bartles & James Wine Cooler era before you’ll see a series of ads to match the “Pinkies Down” series from Union Wine Company out of Oregon.

I find the ads to be hysterical, poking fun at the techniques and (often) pretense that a thorough knowledge of wine requires. After the various actor-snobs establish their unabashed and off-putting wine bonafides in four amusing scenarios, salvation is delivered in the form of the Union Wine Co product – wine in a can.

Kudos to the agency Story Manufacturing Company out of Portland. Even if you don’t have the time to watch all of them right now, do it anyway. Especially if you’re in the wine industry. Here’s the first one to get you started. Just look for the links to the remainder after this one finishes.

Wine Snob - Ad for Canned Wine

Cheers!  Dave the Wine Merchant

Take care: wines are getting stronger | Life and style | The Observer

Last weekend’s article from the Guardian’s ‘The Observer’ justifies a skim by any wine lover.  But before you click the link, my two cents…

First, please note the article’s premise – that the global average alcohol in wine has increased by 2% over 20 years - is greatly misleading.  It refers to an increase in average alcohol from, say, 12.5% in 1994 to 14.5% in 2014 (a 16% increase), not merely a 2% increase OF the base rate (or in this example, 12.5% x 1.02 = a more modest 12.8%). [Disclaimer, my numbers are for example only, yet are roughly accurate, based on my memory of prior research and reading.]

Also, the article understates the contentious nature of the “low alcohol vs high alcohol” camps within the wine world – the intra-industry vitriol launched between the two opposing camps is the sort of stuff you can’t read out load in front of the kids.  

As a wine merchant, I’d appreciate your feedback regarding the wine style you prefer, if any.  I welcome all wine lovers into our camp.  It would also be helpful to hear whether you usually drink wine on its own (as a “Cocktail”) or with food, and if you drink wine in both settings, whether you prefer the same or different wine styles.  Many thanks…

Take care: wines are getting stronger | Life and style | The Observer.

Book Review : “Provence, Food & Wine, the Art of Living”

Cover Photo: Provence Food & Wine

Authors: François Millo, Viktorija Todorovska

When I visit a new vacation spot, particularly one as captivating as Provence, I come home laden with gifts and souvenirs that remind me of my time away.  My favorite ones are long-lasting and usable on a regular basis.

For example, I once stayed at a hotel where the in-room toothpaste was flavored with grapefruit.  Though odd at first, I soon began looking forward to it.  So on my way to the airport I stopped by a Drug Store and bought two or three tubes of the stuff.  For months I was reminded of France at least twice a day!

If you like this idea, but aren’t sure you want Grapefruit-flavored dentifrice, you’ll find that a good regional cook book is an excellent alternative. It can provide a lifetime of experiences that will pull you back into vacation mode from the time you begin shopping for ingredients until you finish drying the last dish.  

But finding a good one can be a challenge – even if the translation is adequate, old-world cooks often under-communicate techniques that they’re taught shortly after suckling but are unfamiliar to those outside the region.  And books by New World authors often miss the authenticity you fell in love with in situ.

Provence Food & Wine - ImagesEnter Millo and Todorovska, the authors of “Provence Food & Wine, the Art of Living”.  Born and raised in Provence, Millo is a talented photographer (not surprisingly, the photos in this book are captivating) and enthusiastic advocate of his region.  His partner in this project is a Chicago-based cookbook author, food and wine educator, and owner of the food, wine and travel company www.oliviacooking.com.  Together, they’ve put together a book that is part travel brochure, part history book, part photo book and part cookbook.  All-in-all, it’s a nice way to spend an evening or two.

The recipes offer some easy dishes ideal for light mid-week meals as well as some more complex meals that are a better fit for a weekend, if your schedule looks anything like ours.  But over-all, this is the best collection of regional dishes I’ve seen in my two decades of casual searching for such things, and for this I thank the authors. 

Provence Food & Wine - Wine ImagesAs for the wine, the book comes with a helpful map of the Provence AOCs, and covers each one in enough detail to belie Todorovska’s wine educator chops.  But the authors primary passion is clearly Provençal Rosé.  And who can blame them?!  These wines are dry, perfect for a hot summer day and, due to their good acidity and mid-weight body, pair beautifully with a huge range of dishes.  Plus, they’ve been enjoying ~40% YOY sales growth over the past few years.  So yes, they are very worthy of emphasis.  If you were in pursuit of the coarse, spicy reds from this region, you’ll find they’ve gotten rather short shrift, however.

In summary, this book is not for everyone, but if you love Provence, if you love the food and wine of the region, and you want to bring them into your home on a regular basis, I don’t think you’ll ever be disappointed that you separated with the reasonable $20 fee – available at Surrey Books.

Cheers!

Dave the Wine Merchant

P.S. No compensation was received in exchange for this review.  A complimentary copy of the book was provided by the publisher for my consideration, but the choice to review it was entirely mine.

If My Stock Picks Were As Good As My Wine Picks…

Au Bon Climat - top 101 WineriesI just received a PR release about “The 101 Best Wineries in America” from The Daily Meal.  Of the nation’s 8,000+ U.S. wine producers, the top 101 were selected by surveys from American wine and food professionals (methodology details can be found below).  So I was pleased to see the list contained NINETEEN of the wineries I’ve introduced to my club members!  

If I had as much skill in selecting stocks I could retire and tour the vineyards of the world year-round.  Hell, I could own a couple dozen.  “Call me Mr. Foley”.  Until then, I’ll spend my day copying the top 10 wineries (below), followed by the publisher’s notes and methodology.  

Note, of the 101 top wineries, 24 do not meet my wine club’s criteria for price or production criteria.

The Top 10 Wineries in America (highlights = wineries introduced to my wine club members)

1. Ridge Vineyards — Cupertino, CaliforniaTop 101 Wineries - Copain
2. Au Bon Climat Winery — Santa Maria, California
3. Calera Wine Company — Mt. Harlan, California
4. Littorai Wines — Sebastopol, California
5. Woodward Canyon Winery — Lowden, Washington
6. Dunn Vineyards — Angwin, California
7. Heitz Cellars — St. Helena, California
8. Matthiasson Winery — Napa Valley, California
9. Sandhi Wines — Santa Barbara, CA
10. Copain Wine Cellars — Healdsburg, CA 

In addition to these three top-ten wineries, my wine club members have enjoyed discovering wines selected from 16 of the remaining award winners (listed alphabetically):

Andrew Murray Vineyards — Los Olivos, CaliforniaTop 101 Wineries - Andrew Murray
Arnot-Roberts — Healdsburg, California
Beckmen Vineyards — Los Olivos, California
Bonny Doon Vineyard — Santa Cruz, California
Caparone Winery — Paso Robles, California
Corison Winery — St. Helena, California
Foxen — Santa Maria, California
Gruet Winery — Albuquerque, New Mexico
Hanzell Vineyards — Sonoma, California
Hirsch Vineyards — Cazadero, California
Mount Eden Vineyards — Saratoga, California
Peay Vineyards — Cloverdale, CaliforniaTop 101 Wineries - Tablas Creek
Qupé — Los Olivos, California
Saxum Vineyards — Paso Robles, California
Tablas CreekCreek Vineyard — Paso Robles, California
Wind Gap Wines — Sebastopol, California 

To see the full story and list of all 101 wineries from “The Daily Meal”, click here.

For more information on my wine clubs click here and discover your next favorite!

PUBLISHER’S NOTES:
While California remains indisputably the wine capital of the country, the number and variety of truly beautiful wines being made in America has grown exponentially in recent years: wine is now produced in all 50 states. This list is largely a reflection of that, and celebrates those wineries that are simply doing it best (many of which are quite unexpected!).

Methodology

The wineries on our list were nominated by experts in the field: the wonderful sommeliers, wine writers, chefs, and restaurateurs who were kind enough to gift us with their opinions about wineries around the country. After their initial nominations, these experts returned to vote on the wines based on the three values we deemed most important: wine quality, consistency, and value. Poring over the voters’ results allowed us to shape the final list of wineries you see here.

We’ve thoroughly plumbed the rich and diverse depths of the American wine landscape, and we are proud of the following list — and of course, grateful to the experts who aided us in determining which American wineries stood out to them.” – Jess Novak, drink editor, The Daily Meal

11th Release of ‘Coro Mendocino’ – Collaborative Winemaking

We all know the significance of certain dates.  July 4th.  December 25th.  June 28th.

Wait.  June 28th?  

Oh yeah. Big day, historically speaking.  The day TV Evangelist Robert Schuller attacked a flight attendant (1997).  And when Houston Astro’s Craig Biggio got his 3000th hit (2007).  It was also the day the first woman was admitted to the Air Force Academy (1976).  Like I said - a big day.

And it’s about to get bigger.  On June 28th of his year, at Mendocino’s charming Little River Inn, the 11th vintage of “Coro Mendocino” enjoys its coming out party.  Sort of makes all that other stuff pale by comparison.  

Little River Inn

Little River Inn, Mendocino Coast. Location for the 2011 “Coro Mendocino” release party.

Never heard of Little River Inn?  It’s a place worthy of a weekend. Super Wife and I have celebrated a number of anniversaries here, and we can’t recommend it highly enough – Chef Marc Dym earned five stars before settling at this resort hotel on the Mendocino coast, and his food alone is worthy of a full blog post.  But I digress – let’s get back to the wine.

Consider yourself fortunate if you’re familiar with the wine, as not many are.  It’s a cool concept - Old-World meets New-World wine making and marketing.  This year, the Coro label has been granted to eight wines produced by eight different Vintners.  It is also the Spanish/Italian word for Chorus, a community of synchronized voices that is similar to the concept behind Coro Mendocino -  winemakers coming together to set standards for a class of wines to represent their wine region.

 

Coro 2010 vintage release

Last year’s Coro wines stand at attention during their release party.

Though typical in Europe, in the U.S. such regional restrictions are unique to Coro Mendocino.  Winemakers producing a wine under the “Coro” label must comply with the following requirements, which you’ll likely find evocative of similar requirements in Old World regions such as Rioja, Bordeaux, Champagne or Burgundy:

Coro Mendocino Requirements:

  1. All grapes must be from Mendocino County
  2. Zinfandel, the county’s heritage variety, must make up at least 40% and no more than 70% of the blend.
  3. Nine other types of grapes may be used (a range of Rhone and Italian Varieties)
  4. All wines must age for a minimum of one year in barrel and one year in bottle
  5. All Coro wines must be in the approved bottle, with only the Winegrower’s information to define its birthplace
  6. No wine can be released to the public before all the winemakers in the consortium have deemed each entry as worthy during a blind-tasting.
  7. More fine print essentially insists that the group’s production protocols and bylaws be followed

So June 28th marks the first public tasting of these eight different “Coro” wines.  The entry price tag is steep, but before you move on to the next thing in your inbox, note that the $500 fee includes dinner for two AND a bottle of each of the eight Coro wines.

2011 Coro Mendocino Release Party

WHERE:               Little River Inn — Little River, CA

WHEN:                 Saturday, June 28th, 2014 – 6 p.m.

WHAT:                 Multi-course, progressive dinner for two prepared by Chef Dym using local and seasonal ingredients

PRICE:                   $500 per couple – Ticket info here

WINE:                   Coro Mendocino 2011 vintage collection (and other wines) by

  1. Barra of Mendocino
  2. Brutocao Cellars
  3. Clos du Bois
  4. Golden Vineyards
  5. McFadden Vineyard
  6. Parducci Wine Cellars
  7. Fetzer Vineyards and
  8. Testa Vineyards

Enjoy!

Dave ‘the Wine Merchant’



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