Chicken Cordon Bleu with Caramelized Shallot Sauce

Early in my nascent bachelor days, when I was living on my own and on a very limited budget, this was my go-to dish whenever I needed to impress a guest. Although I’ve paired it here with a new world pinot noir, I also like the higher acidity of Burgundy or New Zealand pinots, or even an unoaked Chablis or California Chardonnay, which works better with the sharp Swiss cheese than does an oaked version of same.

Ingredients (Serves 6)

6 (~ 4-Oz) skinless, boneless chicken breasts For The Sauce:
6 Slices prosciutto, fairly thick 1 Cup thinly sliced shallots
6 Slices Gruyère cheese 2 tsp tomato paste
1 1/2 Cups arugula, stems removed 2 Cups dry white wine
1/2 tsp ea. salt and ground black pepper 2 1/4 Cups low-sodium chicken broth
Kitchen twine (i.e., food grade) 1 1/2 tsp Water
1 tablespoon olive oil 1 tsp Cornstarch

Procedure

Preheat oven to 350°.  Place a shallow baking pan in the oven for later.

To prepare the chicken, place each chicken breast between 2 sheets of heavy-duty plastic wrap (tip, sprinkle the wrap with water to prevent sticking and splitting).  Using a meat mallet or any heavy, flat item, pound each breast to 1/4-inch thickness.  Top each chicken breast with 1 slice prosciutto, 1 slice cheese, and 1/4 cup arugula, leaving a 1/4-inch border around edges. Fold in half (the long way) and tie with string to form a cylinder.  Sprinkle generously with salt and pepper as most will remain in the pan. (The chicken can be prepared up to a day ahead and refrigerated at this point.)

Heat a large saucepan over medium-high heat for three minutes.  Remove from heat, and cover the bottom of the pan with a thin layer of olive oil, then add the shallots and sauté 4 minutes or until browned. Stirring constantly, add the tomato paste and after 1 minute add the wine as you continue to stir.  Increase heat to high (you can stop stirring now) and bring to a boil, cooking until reduced to 1 cup (about 6 minutes). Stir in the broth and bring to a boil again. Cook until reduced by half (about 8 minutes).  Turn heat to low and keep warm.

Meanwhile, heat a large skillet over medium-high heat for three minutes. Remove from heat and coat the entire bottom with a thin layer of olive oil, then add chicken and return pan to heat, cooking until golden brown, <9 minutes total.  When ready to move the chicken to the baking pan, turn off the oven and keep warm while you finish the sauce.

When sauce is reduced by half, dissolve the cornstarch in a small bowl, stirring with a fork until smooth. Add to sauce, bring to a boil and cook for 1 minute, stirring constantly.

To serve, remove strings from each breast, top with sauce and serve with polenta, a steamed green vegetable.  I like to lean the chicken half way onto the polenta to break up the symmetry.

Bon Appétit!
Dave the Wine Merchant

866-746-7293

dave@sidewayswineclub.com

Cabernet Sauvignon & Slow-Cooked Prime Rib

Standing Rib RoastA standing rib roast (AKA “Prime Rib”) is a classic dish for the Christmas Holiday, but I love it all winter long.  This recipe is a little time consuming (despite being quite easy to prepare) and it’s expensive, so if you’re like me, the risk of failure discourages this item from appearing on your home menu with regularity.

But Superwife and I have discovered a fool-proof method that perfectly renders your prime rib every time – nice and crusty on the outside, and moist and butter-tender on the inside.  The first thing to note is the most critical step occurs long before cooking actually begins – and this step is critical – you’ll need to dry your meat in the refrigerator for 3 – 5 days, so plan ahead!

Ingredients (Serves 6 – 8)

1 Standing rib roast (~7 lbs).  Ask for the ‘First Cut’ or ‘Loin End’

1 Roll of Kitchen Twine (a food-grade string available in most good grocery stores)

Salt and pepper

A roasting pan and meat rack

Procedure

5 Days Before Serving – Buy your roast of choice.  Tie it with Kitchen Twine, looping the twine around the roast and in between each of the bones (see photo).  Dry the roast in your refrigerator for 3-5 days, if possible.  This adds flavor and makes the prime rib more tender.

7 ½ Hours Before Serving – Remove from refrigerator and let come to room temperature for three hours.  Trim excess fat and any bits of meat that are fully de-hydrated.

4 Hours Before Serving – Position oven racks so your roast can sits in the vertical middle of your oven.  Heat oven to 200 degrees (yes, trust me, this works perfectly and is safe and you’ll be thrilled with the result).  Wash the roasting pan and heat for three minutes over two burners on Medium-High.  Coat pan with olive oil and brown meat on all sides.  Season with salt and pepper.

In the pan, set the rack under the roast and place in oven.  Cook for 30 minutes per pound or until internal temperature reaches 130 (for medium-rare) in its meatiest center.

30 Minutes before serving – Remove from oven and place roast on cutting board.  Allow to rest for 20 minutes before carving.  This step is critical.  The extra ten minutes are allocated for carving and plating.

Time To Serve! – Cut the string and place the roast on a cutting board with the bones sticking straight up.  Use a carving fork to push the meat away from the bones while using a carving knife to separate the bones from the meat – save them to gnaw on after your guests go home.  Rotate the roast until it is cut-side down then slice across the grain to desired thickness.

Cheers!
Dave the Wine Merchant
dave@sidewayswineclub.com
866-746-7293

Pinot Noir and Slow-Cooked Lamb Tagine

A couple of months ago, an old friend of ours (Drew) married a new friend of ours (Bridget).  They provided a generous budget and I provided a generous wine list for their grand event.  After the honeymoon they invited us over for dinner.  I was impressed at this amazing meal in the middle of Bridget’s hectic work week.  But when she shared her recipe I saw that it’s made in a slow cooker – this is a dish you can enjoy any night of the week!  That impresses me even more.

Because of the slow cooking, the lamb practically melts in your mouth.  And this dish has a  sweetness that balances its acidity, reflecting and complimenting the dynamic in a good Pinot Noir.

Ingredients (Serves 4+)

3 Lbs lamb (1/2” cubes of shoulder or leg) 1 Bunch fresh cilantro
1 Clove garlic, chopped 2 Tbsp butter
2 Tomatoes, chopped 2 Large sweet onions, halved and sliced thin
1 Tbsp ground cinnamon 1 ½ tsp Ground cumin
2 tsp Sugar ¾ Cup golden raisins
Salt and ground black pepper 2 Cups instant couscous, cooked in lightly salted water and fluffed with a fork
1 Tbsp tom paste (if tomatoes under-ripe)

Procedure

7 Hours Before Serving

In a 4-Qt Crock Pot (slow-cooker), add all the ingredients from the first column (above) with a ½ Cup of water.  Keeping the Cilantro in its bunch, trim the stems and tie them together with kitchen string, setting the leaves aside.  Nestle the stems into the ingredients in the slow cooker.  Cook on low for 5-6 hours.  Remove and discard the stems prior to serving.

30 Minutes Before Serving

Thirty minutes before serving time, Put the butter, onions and cumin in a sauté pan and cook over low heat for about 30 minutes. Stir occasionally.  When onions are a deep golden brown, season with salt and pepper and remove from heat.

20 Minutes Before Serving

Skim off as much of the fat from the Tagine as possible and remove the embedded stems.  Reserving a few for garnish, roughly chop the cilantro leaves and stir them with the raisins into the tagine.  Turn the slow cooker to high and continue to cook, uncovered.

About 10 Minutes Before Serving

Prepare the couscous according to package directions.

To Serve
Spoon the couscous onto a serving platter and top with the lamb, then the caramelized onions and finally the whole cilantro leaves you set aside.

Cheers!
Dave the Wine Merchant
Dave@SidewaysWineClub.com
866-746-7293

“Runaway” Chicken Chowder

I’m never sure if the name for this dish refers to the chicken seeking escape from the chopping block, or the recipe’s run-away popularity.  Either way, its bright orange color (and great flavor!) has made it the traditional dish at the annual family Halloween party hosted by our friend (and club member!) Laura Nagle.

It is one of the rare dishes featuring Halloween colors that is not a contrivance, but rather a memorable dish in its own right.  In fact, at the Nagle’s annual Halloween bash, it just may be as big an attraction as the candy.  At least for some attendees  ;-)

Recommended Wine Pairings
This chowder has the sweetness of the yams, a bit of a warming kick from the peppers and the rich texture of  the chicken and hominy.  To compliment all elements, I recommend an off-dry Riesling or Gewurztraminer (click to buy) or one featuring a nose-full of fragrance and a fuller body – a classic California Chardonnay or a rich white Rhône wine such as Viognier.

Ingredients
3 Boneless chicken breasts
3 Tbsp unsalted butter
1 Med onion, peeled and thinly sliced
1 or 2 Large golden yams,  peeled and sliced thin (2-3 millimeters)
4 1/2 Cups Chicken stock or broth
1-2 Serranno peppers seeded and minced
1/2 tsp Ground coriander
2-3 tsp Ground cumin
2 Cans golden hominy (16-Ozs), drained
2/3 Cups fresh cilantro
Toasted Black sesame seeds or toasted Rye bread croutons for garnish (optional)
Sour Cream for garnish

Procedure
Remove the skin and fat from the chicken and cut into 3/4 inch cubes.

Over high heat, melt butter in stock pot or large sauce pan and stir-fry chicken, stirring constantly, just until no longer pink. Remove with slotted spoon and set aside to drain.

Add onion and potato slices to pan with 4 1/2 cups of stock. Cover and bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer until veggies are soft, about 20 minutes. Add the peppers, coriander and cumin and blend in the pot with a stick blender, or in batches in food processor or blender. Whatever your blending tool of choice, continue until smooth.

Return all ingredients to the pot and add the chicken and the hominy. This chowder can be prepared up to this point and refrigerated for up to two days.  Also freezes well.  When ready to serve, simply heat, top with cilantro leaves and garnish with sour cream, if desired.

Serving Ideas
This chowder is welcome throughout the cold winter months. But to leverage the Halloween theme (for which this orange soup is ideal!) sprinkle with black sesame seeds or croutons made from dark rye bread.

Cheers!
Dave the Wine Merchant

Moules Marinieres – Mariner’s Mussels, the Highway to Heavean!

Mussels Marineires recipeFor one of my rather large birthdays, the kind that either demands a grand celebration with friends or a quiet closet in which to whimper, Superwife and Cole surprised me with a trip to the Loire Valley.  One of my favorite meals was at this street side cafe in Tours.

This simple meal – mussels, crisp french fries, a fresh baguette and a cool glass of local Chenin Blanc – brought me closer to heaven than I probably deserve (or will ever be again, now that St. Peter knows I’ve found this loophole).

Wine Pairing Ideas
When paired well, the right wines can provide the same slice of Tours street side nirvana. So pull a cork on one of these wines, splash some into your glass, then add some fresh-shucked oysters or steam some mussels (recipe below) and you’re in for an hour of pure happiness.


Moules Marinières with Lardon

Moules Marinières are also known as “Sailor’s mussels” or “Mariner’s mussels.”  This basic dish consists of fresh mussels delicately steamed in white wine with garlic, parsley, butter, onion and cream sauce. The addition of lardons by the chef at our sidewalk cafe was a unique twist, adding a permeating smokiness.   Along with the small amount of cream added to the juice, this extra richness suggests a fuller-bodied white wine – an austere wine will fight this dish.  Think Dry or off-dry Riesling, Chenin Blanc, unoaked Chardonnay and perhaps even Viognier from a cooler clime.

Be sure to have a good baguette (more than you think you’ll need) to dip into the delectable sauce and juices once your mussels are gone. Mussel veterans eat by using an empty mussel shell as a pincer to pick the remaining mussels from their shells – a fun way to eat with your fingers!

Ingredients (serves 2 as a main course, 4 as an opening course)

  • 2+ Lbs of fresh, live mussels
  • 1/2 Pound thick bacon or pancetta, cubed
  • 2 cloves of chopped garlic
  • 1 finely chopped shallot
  • 5 fl oz (1 glass) of dry white wine
  • 2 Tbsp Butter
  • 1 large handful of finely chopped parsley
  • 4 tbsp of cream
  • salt and pepper

Procedure
Clean, debeard and rinse the mussels several times in cold running water. Discard any that do not snap shut when tapped and set the rest aside in a colander. Cook the lardons in the bottom of a wide, deep pot until crispy but not burned. Remove, drain on paper towel.  Remove all but one Tbsp of bacon fat, add enough butter to equal 2 Tbsp total, then add the chopped shallot and garlic. Cook for a few minutes on a medium heat until the shallots have softened.

Add the white wine and bring to a boil, stirring occasionally. Add mussels and cover, cooking on a high heat for several minutes. Gently shake the pan several times during cooking to redistribute the mussels. It is best to remove the mussels one by one as they open, placing them in a colander with a bowl underneath to catch the juices – liquid gold. Again, discard any mussels that have remained tightly shut, as they may produce unpleasant gastro-intestinal side effects (you don’t want to know).

Return the lardons to the liquid and boil until reduced by half. Stir in the cream and parsley. Taste the sauce and add salt or pepper to taste. Transfer the mussels to a large bowl, pour the reduced liquid over the mussels, and serve immediately. Pair with any of these wines and you’ll agree that happiness is at hand.

Les_moules_cropped_and_lightenedCheers!
Dave the Wine Merchant

Quote of the Day
Tell me what you eat, and I’ll tell you who you are.
~Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin, French gastronome (1755 – 1826)

 

Wild Boar-Tomatillo Chili

On most weekends, we haunt the hills of Anderson Valley, where we try to grow olives.  One weekend several years ago, Superwife got the notion that a perfectly good Saturday morning should be spent putting her jogging shoes one in front of the other until they took her to the top of the hill (elevation 1,100 feet).  Never one to follow another’s path, she blazed her own trail, and in so doing startled a small family of large feral pigs, who were apparently unaccustomed to seeing such energetic humans.

Though feral pigs are a few generations removed from wild boar, but they replicate like rabbits, have a taste that’s more flavorful than farm-raised pork, and can tear up acres and acres of virgin hillside as they forage.  This is an unfortunate combination of traits, as it makes them quite popular with the local hunters.  Their foraged diets make their meat a little richer and gamier than pork, a bit less so than wild boar.  Any of the three meats are acceptable here (1-2 days advance notice is usually required to obtain wild boar).  Whichever meat you use, ask your butcher to grind enough for ingredient #2, below…

INGREDIENTS (6-8 servings)

2 Tbsp olive oil 1 tsp smoked paprika
½ Lb ground wild boar 1 Bottle dark beer
1.5 Lbs wild boar shoulder, in1/2-inch dice 1.5 Lbs tomatillos, husked and coarsely chopped (yes, they are oddly sticky!)
Kosher salt & fresh-ground black pepper 1/2 Cup crushed tomatoes (canned or fresh)
1 Large white onion, chopped 1 Cup chicken broth
4 Cloves garlic, minced 2 (14.5-ounce) cans pinto beans, drained
2 Large Anaheim peppers, diced small Juice from ½ a lime
2 Jalapeno peppers, seeded and minced Garnish:
1 Tbsp chili powder Chopped red onions
1 Tbsp dried oregano Sour cream
2 tsp ground cumin Chopped cilantro

Procedure
Season the meat (both the shoulder and the ground portion), with salt and pepper. Heat a large Dutch oven or stockpot over medium-high heat for three or four minutes, add half the olive oil and when it shimmers, brown all the meat in two batches for 3-4 minutes.  Remove and set aside.

Add remaining olive oil and sauté onions for about 5 minutes over medium heat.  Add the garlic and sauté for another minute, then add the peppers and continue for another 3-5 minutes. Return meat to pot and add a tsp salt, ½ teaspoon pepper, the chili powder, cumin, oregano and smoked paprika.  Combine until the spices are evenly distributed. Deglaze the pot with the beer, scraping up the flavorful browned bits on the bottom!

Add tomatillos, crushed tomatoes and chicken broth, and bring to a simmer. Cook for about 45 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the pinto beans and continue to cook for another 45 minutes, again stirring occasionally. Just before serving, stir in the lime juice, taste for seasoning adjustments, then garnish and serve!

Adapted from a recipe by Amanda Gold, San Francisco Chronicle

DSCN0419Cheers!
Dave the Wine Merchant

NOTE: This recipe was included as an insert with the October, 2009 shipment to members of my wine sampling program.  Click here for membership information.   To see additional wine pairings for this dish, try my Rhone Style Reds selections, or my collection of Zinfandels.  The spice of the chili can sometimes fight a high-alcohol wine.  Minimize this by selecting one with enough ripe fruit to balance the alcohol and to serve as a salve for heat-tenerized taste buds!

Syrah with Coca-Cola Braised Short Ribs

Luella restaurant san franciscoThe day before Leslie became Superwife, we held a rehearsal dinner at a San Francisco restaurant called Andalu, where their specialty dish – cola-braised short ribs – was among the night’s most popular dishes.  Several years later, Andalu’s founding chef, Ben Devries, left to start a restaurant named Luella, and has enjoyed great success there as well.  Ben and his wife have made Sunday nights at Luella into family nights, with a separate menu for kids, while maintaining a full menu for the parents.

About that time, Ben and his wife, enrolled their daughter in the same school our daughter attends.  So he and I sometimes find ourselves watching school events from the sidelines, as we discuss the latest trends affecting our livelihoods.

Here’s the Devries-inspired recipe for Coke-braised short ribs – a perfect pairing for Syrah (click here to view my current inventory of compatible wines for this dish).  It is simple and delicious, but it does take some time…

 

Ingredients (Serves 6)

RIBS PICKLED ONIONS
4 Lbs pork ribs 1 Red onion, halved and sliced
Salt & Pepper ¾ Cup red wine vinegar
1 Liter Coca-Cola 2 Tbsp sugar
2 Quarts Chicken Stock Water to cover

 

 

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Procedure

Preheat your oven to 400.  Season the ribs with salt and pepper. Heat a deep roasting pan over high heat for three minutes, add oil and sear the meat until golden brown on all sides – about 7 minutes total. Remove the ribs from the pan and set aside.  With the pan still on high heat, add the Coke and reduce by ⅔.  Add the chicken stock and bring to a boil. Return meat to the liquid, cover and put in a 400 degree oven for 2 hrs or until meat falls off the bone.

Remove from the oven and let rest, preferably overnight. Reheat in a 400 degree oven until hot.  Remove meat from the pan, place remaining sauce on stove top at medium heat and reduce until syrupy. Return ribs to sauce until ready to serve.

PICKLED RED ONIONS
Place all ingredients in sauce pot, bring to a boil, and turn down to a simmer for 5 mins.
Take off flame and let cool. To make sharper add more vinegar; to make sweeter, add more sugar.

TO SERVE:
Place ribs over a bed of mashed potatoes and top with pickled red onions.  Serve with Syrah or other Rhône-style wine.

Cheers!
Dave the Wine Merchant
Dave@SidewaysWineClub.com


Pinot Noir with Chicken in Balsamic-Cherry Sauce

I must confess to an unabashed and obvious bridge ingredient here – the savory cherry sauce evokes pinot noir better than anything except maybe cranberries.  Come to think of it, cranberries would be a good experimental substitute for the cherries – I’d try them with blueberries as well.

Ingredients
6 Boneless chicken breasts (halves)
2 Tbsp ea. – olive oil and butter
3 Shallots, minced
3 Cloves garlic, minced
½ Cup pinot noir (drinkable, but not expensive)
3 Tbsp Balsamic Vinegar
½ Cup chicken stock
½ Cup heavy cream
1 Small tomato, peeled, seeded and chopped
½ Pint (or ½ can) cherries, pitted
Salt and pepper to taste

Procedure
Place a breast (the chicken’s, not yours) between two generous layers of plastic wrap.  Using any heavy, flat item (though not flat, a rolling pin or empty wine bottle will suffice) pound the breast to half its original thickness.  Tip, wetting the plastic wrap helps prevent breakage during pounding.

Over medium high, heat a wide skillet for ~3 minutes, add the olive oil, then the butter.  When melted, sauté the chicken breasts in batches, without crowding the pan.  Sauté until just barely browned on each side (the inside should still be slightly pink at this point).  Remove to a warm oven and hold.

Add the shallots and garlic to skillet and cook 6-8 minutes or until tender.  Add wine and vinegar and scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan.  Bring to a boil while stirring constantly.  Continue to simmer rapidly until reduced to about 1/3 – ½ cup.  Add chicken stock, cream and tomato and simmer until sauce is reduced by almost half, about 5 minutes.

Add cherries to sauce and stir to warm.  After a minute or two, return the chicken and its drippings to the skillet and warm thoroughly, about another three minutes.  Add a touch of salt and a generous amount of cracked pepper.  Serve sauce over chicken.

DSCN0417Bon Appétit!
Dave the Wine Merchant

NOTE: This recipe originally appeared in materials sent to members of “My Pinot Selections” – a bi-0monthly wine sampling program.  To review wines currently in stock that will pair well with this recipe, click here.

Merlot with Braised Beef Short Ribs

When this marinade and slow-cooking process are used on a cut of meat with lots of well-marbled fat and connective tissue (Flank or Top Round are also fine) the resulting flavor and mouthfeel are perfect for this wine.  I again employ my secret ingredient – vanilla – which echoes the flavor of the wine. It really works!

Note: This recipe originally appeared as an insert with my October, 2009 club shipment.  Click here to see wines that pair well with this recipe.

Ingredients

6 Lbs beef short ribs 4 Ozs dried cherries
¼ Cup flour ¼ Cup fresh Thyme sprigs
½ Cup olive oil, divided 4 Sage leaves, fresh
3 Cups chopped onion 3 Bay leaves
2 Cups chopped carrots 2 Cups Merlot (don’t use the good stuff!)
2 Cups chopped celery 4 Cups low-sodium beef broth
8 Cloves garlic, peeled 1-2 tsp Balsamic Vinegar
1 scant tsp Vanilla

Procedure
Preheat oven to 300°.  Put ribs in large bowl and coat well with salt, pepper, and flour.  Heat a heavy Dutch oven or stock pot over medium-high heat for ~4 minutes.  Add half the olive oil and brown ribs all over, working in batches.  Set browned ribs aside.

Add remaining oil to empty pot and, when hot, add the Mirepoix (the holy trinity of onion, carrot and celery).  Cook until softened, about 10 minutes.  Add the garlic, dried cherries  and the herbs and combine well.  Deglaze the pot with the red wine then return ribs to the pot.  Bring to a simmer and reduce for about five minutes.  Add the broth, cover, and place in oven to braise until ribs are tender – check after two hours but plan for three.

Remove from oven and let stand for 15 minutes.  Remove ribs and set aside (try to keep them on the bone!), and remove Thyme sprigs and Bay leaves.  Pour remaining ingredients into a food mill (or pulse in a food processor six or seven times until finely chunked), then return to pot.   Spoon off any fat, season to taste with salt and pepper, then add balsamic and Vanilla.  Return ribs to sauce until warmed through, serve with extra sauce spooned over ribs.

Serving Suggestion: Stand the ribs upright in mashed potatoes, spoon remaining sauce over both, and serve with a side dish of sautéed spinach.

Happy MerchantCheers!
Dave the Wine Merchant

Note: This recipe originally appeared as an insert with my October, 2009 shipment to members of my “Grand Cru Selections” sampling program.

Click here to see my current inventory of wines that pair well with this recipe.

Pork Ribs, Tuscan-Style (For Earthy Red Wines)

This month, my recipes seem to center around ribs.  I guess I’m craving these hearty fall-off-the-bone dishes as Autumn approaches.  Hope you are too!

These ribs are best when slowly cooked using low, indirect heat on your charcoal grill, but they are still delicious when slow-roasted in your oven until tender and crisp.  They are generously seasoned with aromatic herbs and spices that compliment the earthiness in a lighter wine, though they do have a bit of spice kick that will fight with high-alcohol wines.  What makes them Tuscan is the simple balsamic glaze finish, Balsamic vinegar being a Tuscan specialty.  I’ve adapted it here with a touch of vanilla, which helps round it out and bridge more effectively with Pinot Noir and other domestic reds.  Other bridge ingredients would include cherry juice or cranberry juice, and I encourage experimentation if these ingredients are handy in your kitchen.

Note: This recipe originally appeared as an insert with my October, 2009 shipment to members of my “Pinot Selection” sampling program.  Though optimized to showcase an earthy Pinot Noir, it works well with other such wines, such as a good Rhone-style wine (look for with alcohol below 14.5% or it will fight the spicy heat of these ribs) or the old-world wines of Italy.  Click here to see some current selections  that work well.

Ingredients (Serves 6)
2  Tbsp chopped rosemary
1 Scant Tbsp kosher salt
1 ½ Tbsp fennel seeds
2 tsp Freshly ground black pepper
2 tsp Chopped sage
2 tsp Chopped thyme
2 tsp Sweet paprika
1 Pinch crushed red pepper flakes
1 tsp Ground coriander
1 tsp Ground cumin
1/2 tsp Ground allspice
3 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
6 Lbs pork spareribs
4 Tbsp Balsamic Vinegar
1 Scant tsp vanilla extract

Procedure
Combine all but the last three ingredients in the bowl of a food processor and pulse until well mixed. Rub the spice paste over the meaty side of the spareribs and let stand at room temperature for 2 hours or refrigerate for a day.

Three hours before your planned mealtime, bring your grill (or oven) up to 300° (this is a low heat, requiring no more than 30 or so briquettes, though you’ll need to add five more every 45 minutes or so. Arrange the ribs on the indirect portion of your grill (or on a large, rimmed baking sheet or roasting pan if cooking in your oven) with the meaty side up.  Roast until tender, about two hours.

Remove ribs from heat.  Combine the vanilla and balsamic vinegar, then brush the meaty side of the ribs and return to the direct heat side of the grill (or 6” under the broiler) until browned, ~2 minutes. Let stand for 5 minutes, then cut between the ribs and serve.

Serving Suggestion: mashed potatoes with chives, gingered carrots.

Adapted from a recipe by Bruce Aidells

DTWM Video Still croppedCheers!
Dave the Wine Merchant

Note: This recipe originally appeared as an insert with my October, 2009 shipment to members of my “Pinot Selection” sampling program.  Though optimized to showcase an earthy Pinot Noir, it works well with other such wines, such as a good Rhone-style wine (look for with alcohol below 14.5% or it will fight the spicy heat of these ribs) or the old-world wines of Italy.  Click here to see some current selections  that work well.