Rosé All Day, 2020

Image from Wine Folly, a great source for fun wine info!

The popularity of dry Rosé continued its upward trend in 2019 and now accounts for over 19% of all U.S. wine sales among both men and women.  But today’s demand surge comes after many decades of winelovers shunning the category.

And I’m agey enough to know why! I clearly recall the White Zinfandel craze of the late 70’s and early 80’s – a sweet wine designed to appeal to a generation raised on Colas and KoolAid. The wine was a huge success for a decade, but became anethema to serious wine lovers as they discovered dry Rosés they could take to the table, just as they do in the old world wine regions, where Rosé  is a staple in every seaside village in Europe.

The current Rosé boom can be attributed largely to the efforts of one man, Sacha Lechine, the son of Russian wine writer Alexis Lechine, an influencer in his day and owner of Château Prieuré-Lichine, control of which was turned over to Sacha at the young age of 27.

When Sacha decided to make the greatest Rosé in the world in 2006, he introduced the world to the first Rosé ever to be priced at $100 a bottle (Garrus). Garrus Rosé led Sacha’s more affordable line up – in descending order of price – Les Clans, Rock Angel and Whispering Angel (which now sells for about $20 a bottle), the latter having been dubbed “Hamptons Water” for its popularity there. I’ve made inquiries as to whether Hamptonians actually use it for bathing, but have no reply at the time of this writing. But it’s easy to see how the wine was so named – Sacha’s Rosés are dry and light enough to drink all day, a foundation of the current style of Rosé that has become so popular.

Sadly, Sacha’s wines are so easily found they no longer qualify for my portfolio of interesting wine ‘discoveries’. But with popularity comes higher prices, and many of the following Rosés are even more affordable than his Sotto Voce Angel!

As evidenced by the five arrows that define the family seal (on this bottle, you’ll see it on the necker) this wine is from the Rothschild family (the Lafite side of the family, not the Mouton side). The logo has been in use since  the mid 1800’s, and represents the five siblings that inherited the family business – as the deathbed story goes, the patriarch called the family together during his final days and asked each of the siblings to break a bundle of five darts. When they were unable to do so, he proceeded to break each of the five darts separately, illustrating that the family’s strength was in staying together.  

The Los Vascos is a wine I don’t carry, as it’s commonly available in distribution and doesn’t qualify for my “Discovery” status, so there is no link provided here. But I endorse it as an affordable and delicious Rosé. You can generally find it for about $15. 

From Rothschild’s Chilean property, this blended wine is predoiminantly Cabernet – a grape I don’t care for when made as a Rosé. This wine is a delicious exception! It’s refreshing crispness makes me wonder if acid was added, as Cabernet is not known for high acidity, but manual additions of acid during the winemaking phase tend to leave a wine with slight traces of a flavor that reminds me of children’s aspirin or vitamin C, elements I did not detect here. Or perhaps its deliciousness is from the blend of the more traditional Rhone varieites that make up the balance. Either way, don’t question it, just twist off the screwcap and enjoy!

Bucklin Rose of Old Hill Ranch, $23.99

The Bucklin Rose of Old Hill Ranch is a blend of Zinfandel (62%) and the classic grapes of the Southern Rhone – Grenache, Mourvedre, Syrah and Counoise (38%) . The vineyard has existed since the 1860’s, and owned by the Bucklin family since 1981.

The grapes are harvested early (a sign the Rosé is an intentional product and not just the by-product of red wine produciton), whole cluster pressed, then the juice is fermented cold using indigenous yeast and finished dry. The wine is very pale in color, beautifully aromatic and crisp on the finish. Alc. 12.8%. 282 cases produced.

The Bucklin family history is rich and colorful and deserves more space than I have here. So for the curious with a bit of time on their hands, you can read more here.

Five Roses Rosato, $16.99

The Wine – A field blend of Negroamaro (NEH groh ah MAH dho, sort of) and Malvasia (MAHL vah SEE ah)  from Southern Italy. The Five Roses Rosato was first produced in 1943 – the first rosé bottled in Italy and the first Italian rosé to be sold in the U.S. For several generations, each of the de Castris had five children, just by chance, hence the name ‘Five Roses’.  This is their most famous wine internationally.

The Winery -Leone de Castris began exporting in the early 1800’s, nearly 140 years after the company was founded in 1665. Visitors can enjoy the exporter’s gourmet restaurant and luxury hotel, Villa Donna Lisa.  Leone de Castris produces only Apulian products, such is their commitment to the Puglia region of southern Italy (“the heel of the boot”) – a region made famous for its food and wine by the famous A-16 retaurants in San Francisco and Oakland. Their mission is to make the highest-quality Apulian products possible – in the land where they were born and raised.

Malabaila, Italian Sparkling Rose, fermented in bottle! $19.99

This is an example of what the Italians can do with sparkling wine outside of Prosecco.  From the Alba region, consisting of 100% Nebbiolo (which makes sense, right?  Pinot is the dominant grape in most sparkling Rosés, and Nebby has similar acidity and body, so…).  Fermented in bottle on the lees for 48 months.  I got the LAST of this wine from the distributor.  Woot! Just 8 bottles left in stock.

Tasting notes – Crisp red fruits blend with rich stone fruits and finish with an herbal note.  The lack of any dosage means this is a bone-dry, crisp and mouth-wtering wine,T so don’t be afraid to pair it with food! Try a bottle before they’re gone!
Provence Rosé “Le Provencal” $19.99

And this final Rosé brings us full circle – back to the Provence region of France where Sacha Lechine started the whole dry Rosé movement over a decade ago.

The Wine
Food-friendly, crisp and refreshing, and with moderate alcohol (12.5%), it even comes in the distinctive bottle shape French Rosé producers nicknamed ‘the corset’ – what’s not to love! Classic Provence Rosé – Strawberry, peach and citrus, with a zingy crispness and added interest from the wine’s native minerality.
 
The Producer
Established in Vidauban in 1922, the Mâitres Vignerons de la Vidaubanaise today controls 600 hectares of vines in the heart of the Appellation Côtes de Provence. Located on the limestone foothills of the Maures Massif in the southern Var (between the Mediterranean Sea and the Alps) the terroir benefits from the Mediterranean climate so beneficial for traditional southern varietals such as Grenache, Syrah, Mourvedre, Cinsault, Carignan and Rolle. The various vineyard parcels are vinified separately, allowing for more character and complexity in the winemaker’s final blend.
Dave the Wine Merchant
“Discover your next favorite!”
www.DaveTheWineMerchant.com

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